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Hiking In Sedona: What You Should Know

To get you prepped for your hike in Sedona, we’ve compiled advice into a detailed guide on what to expect when going for a hike in Sedona.

Snowshoeing in Durango: Our 7 Favorite Trails

Snowshoeing in Durango, Colorado this season? Here’s a few of our favorite snowshoeing trails for your next Microadventure in Durango!

Our 10 Favorite Places to Hike in Tucson, AZ

As you’re planning you Tucson, Arizona trip, here are our 10 favorite places to hike with trails around Tucson.

Snowshoeing in Boulder: Our 7 Favorite Trails

Snowshoeing in Boulder, CO this Winter? We’ve compiled a list of our favorite snowshoeing trails to explore in and around the Boulder area.

5 Best Portable Induction Cookers For RVs and Vans

To aid you in your next Microdventure, we have compiled a list of the 5 best portable Induction Cookers for your RV or van.

Our 10 Favorite Family-Friendly Hikes in the Grand Canyon

If you’re considering hiking with your family in the Grand Canyon, here are our 10 favorite family-friendly hiking trails.

What is Car Camping?

Trying to figure out what car camping is and why so many people are doing it? Here we define car camping for you in a simple way.

Car Camping Packing List for Your Microadventure

To aid in getting you set for your next car camping trip, here’s a list of essential and luxury things to pack.

Payson, AZ Free Dispersed Camping Areas

In order to help you narrow down where to camp, here’s a list of our favorite free, dispersed camping spots and areas around Payson, Arizona.

Flagstaff Free Dispersed Camping Map

To help make a decision on where to camp around Flagstaff, AZ, here’s a map of our favorite free, dispersed camping areas and spots.

Our 10 Favorite Hiking Trails in Flagstaff

Looking to go hiking in Flagstaff? Here’s a brief list of our favorite hikes and hiking trails in Flagstaff, Arizona.

A Guide to Camping in Sedona

The famous Red Rock Country city that is Sedona, Arizona. For those who haven’t visited, Sedona is a mecca for Microadventures. With miles of hiking and biking trails, climbing, and towering red sandstone views, you could spend a lifetime exploring Sedona and not see...

Sedona Free Dispersed Camping and Campgrounds Map

Trying to figure out where to camp around Sedona, AZ? We built a map of our favorite established campgrounds and dispersed camping areas.

Our 10 Favorite Hiking Trails in Sedona

With over 200 miles of trails, there’s a lot to choose from in Sedona, Arizona! Here’s a brief list of our favorite hikes in Sedona.

FAQS for Grand Canyon Rim to Rim

We’ve compiled a blog answering some of the most frequently asked questions surrounding the Rim to Rim hike in the Grand Canyon.

Can You Visit Antelope Canyon On Your Own?

No, you need to go with a licensed tour company.

Well, we’re pretty much done here!

In all seriousness, don’t even think about visiting or hiking Antelope Canyon without securing a reservation through a licensed guide or tour company. A permit issued through the Navajo Parks and Recreation department and a guide is required to visit or hike Antelope Canyon- and it seems there is no exception to that rule either.

 



 

Why you should use a tour organization or guide

Antelope-Canyon-Permit-Guide

 

While it might seem frustrating to have to go through a tour organization or guide in order to hike or visit Antelope Canyon, we see it as a positive! During my two visits to Lower Antelope Canyon in 2019, our tour guides from Antelope Canyon Tours were incredible. They offered great advice on how to configure our camera’s white balance to capture the true colors of the slot canyon’s walls and even showed us the best spots to take photos. The guides were highly informative, had a great sense of humor, and were local members of the Navajo Reservation living in Page, Arizona, where Antelope Canyon is located close to.

Hiring a tour guide is a great way to get the most out of your visit to Antelope Canyon and support the Navajo Nation’s residents.

 

How much are tours of Antelope Canyon?

The total price of a tour of Antelope Canyon depends on what tour and outfitter you book your reservation with. In my experience, normal hiking tours ranged from $40-60 depending on the day of the week and season. Photography tours, which are best for serious photography advocates or professionals, can run $125 and up.

The permit and tour costs are almost always bundled together and it is expected to tip after your tour is complete.

 




 

Wrapping up

You cannot hike or visit Antelope Canyon without booking a tour reservation, plain and simple- so don’t even ask when you’re booking a reservation. In my experience, tours are not a necessary evil, but truly worth the money. The two guides I had in 2019 were informative, provided advice on camera settings and composition, and pointed out features in the canyon walls that I would have never seen on my own.

Guides are totally worth the money.

Resources for Antelope Canyon:

Nick The Rambling Man
Nick The Rambling Man

Nick is the owner and regular content writer for Southwest Microadventures. When he’s not writing, you can find him rock climbing, peak bagging, mountain biking, backpacking, or drinking strong coffee.

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